Helsinki – A growing city

Finland suffered great hardship during the World War II, and the post-war reconstruction effort was not completed until the 1950s. With the burgeoning growth of the city in the 1950s and 1960s, the focus of new building shifted to the suburbs. Tapiola Garden City was built among pristine forests and meadows in Espoo, west of […]

Nouveau ideas – boldly modernist architecture

Nouveau ideas Helsinki’s architecture offers many examples of turn of the century Art Nouveau (Jugendstil) and the classicism that followed. These styles can be studied in numerous public buildings. The National Museum, the National Theatre, and Eliel Saarinen’s Central Railway Station are some of the landmarks of this period. Of the original interiors that still […]

Towards metropolitanism

The hectic construction that took place in the closing decades of the nineteenth century is evident nearly everywhere in central Helsinki. Four- and five-storey commercial buildings and residential blocks were erected on Pohjoisesplanadi, Bulevardi, and Erottaja, designed in a style that emulated the architecture of Vienna and Berlin. The so-called period of Eclecticism produced many […]

It started as a modest town

Finland was part of the Swedish empire until the early nineteenth century. Helsinki was founded in 1550 by King Gustavus I Wasa at the mouth of the River Vanda, to compete with the Hanseatic port of Tallinn across the Baltic, and to boost trade with Russia. In 1640, the town was shifted close to the […]

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